Sinead Moriarty: ‘Communion dress shopping is a holy show’

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Sinead Moriarty: ‘Communion dress shopping is a holy show’

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'Some shops are offering a dedicated one-hour slot, so you and every person in your family can clap and cheer each time the little girl comes out in a different dress.' Stock photo: Getty
‘Some shops are offering a dedicated one-hour slot, so you and every person in your family can clap and cheer each time the little girl comes out in a different dress.’ Stock photo: Getty

There has always been a fair amount of palaver around communion dresses. Mothers and daughters heading off to find the ‘perfect’ dress. The big day out shopping, the special bond, the forever memory.

But let’s be honest, these shopping days can often end up with an over-tired and grumpy communion girl and an exhausted mother with a hole in her bank balance.

The latest fad is to create a stress-free ‘bridal experience’ for little girls shopping for their dresses.

Yes, this is actually happening in stores around the country. While on the one hand it seems over the top – as a mother, the idea of sitting down on a comfy sofa while someone else runs around trying to persuade your grumpy eight-year-old to try on yet another dress, does sound quite appealing.

Still, though, it has a decided odour of Celtic Tiger about it. Some shops are providing podiums for your little one to stand on and twirl. And it’s no longer just you and your daughter, shops are encouraging wider family members to join in the ‘fun’. Grannies, aunts, in-laws, they’re all coming to sit on the sofa while the communion girl twirls around on her podium.

Some shops are offering a dedicated one-hour slot, so you and every person in your family can clap and cheer each time the little girl comes out in a different dress.

It’s difficult enough for a mother and daughter to agree on the perfect dress, the idea of adding four or five more women into the decision-making process seems highly dangerous.

Let’s not lose sight of the fact that the children wear the dresses for a few hours. No one needs to bankrupt themselves over it or fall out with their mother in law.

Cashless coffee cutting out the bean counters

Popular Dublin coffee chain Bear Market opened a new branch on George’s Street this week and the owners have decided to make it the first cashless coffee shop in the country.

The owners have decided to run with cashless because they feel that with less time spent fumbling with money, their baristas will have more time to make coffees and chat to customers.

The owners ran with the idea after visiting a cashless store in New York, which they found was “a lot more relaxed”.

With almost 80pc of customers paying via card anyway, they feel it’s not going to cause any issues. In addition to going cashless, Bear Market has also partnered with telecommunications company Magnet Networks to allow customers to pre-order their coffee via an app. Pre-ordered, cash free coffee, sounds good.

A lifetime of experience delivers divine cooking

Move over Jamie Oliver, the old-age pensioners are taking over the world of food.

Two Irish women, Martina Maher (91) and her friend Colette Scully (76) – who have been living in Birmingham for over 50 years – are publishing their first cookbook.

Twenty years ago, the two retired women decided that they wanted to give something back to the Jesuit priests in their community. They decided a way to do so was to cook lunch for them every Sunday.

“When you retire, the problems start because you get bored and fed up… I would say to anyone retiring, get interested in something, and get interested in giving something,” Martina said.

Now their favourite recipes have been collated into a cookbook, ‘Saintly Feasts: A Cookbook For Saints And Scholars’, with the proceeds going to the Jesuit Refugee Service.

Irish Independent

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